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Relationship Check-up: The CEO and the Board Chair

We can have a solid strategic plan, a clear concise mission, an ample donor database. But if the CEO and the Board chair don’t have and seek a strong working relationship, it undermines confidence of staff and rest of the Board and can limit the nonprofit’s capacity to succeed.
So what are some indicators that can help us know we’re good with this relationship?

    Conduct of Board Meetings

: The chair formulates the agenda, in consultation with the CEO. They discuss the agenda about a week prior to each meeting. The Board is the source of nonprofit governance. The CEO and staff execute the program and are accountable for its successful delivery.

    Communicating with Community.

There are roles that should be clarified on when the CEO speaks on behalf of the organization, and when the chair of the board does. This should become a policy, adopted by the Board and reviewed each time a new Chair is elected. So when the nonprofit takes a position on a matter that the community should hear about, we (insiders) know who will speak on a key issue.

    Assessing Performance of the Nonprofit

As a general rule, the CEO oversees performance assessment of staff. And the Board Chair or his/her designee conducts an annual performance review of the CEO. And that review is based on the job description and objectives agreed-to by the Board and CEO at the beginning of each year. This clarity of purpose helps avoid subjective assessments that are not based on pre-determined important factors.

We could discuss more. And I’m happy to have that conversation if you reach out and seek my advice and guidance in making leadership relationships work.

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The Networked Nonprofit CEO

I wrote a couple of years back, “It’s lonely at the top.” It’s a familiar quote, and I’m still seeking correct attribution.
I do know this: It’s as true today as it was when observed for the first time. Which in part is why Paul Harris started Rotary International in Chicago 100+ years ago. To develop a place for fellowship and sharing among business leaders in a community. To provide a place to do good work for the community, together. Yes, that certainly was part of it. But on another level, lunch at Rotary is a time and place for leaders of businesses, law firms, accounting firms and nonprofit organizations to gather and do some informal problem solving. Because really: Whom can you comfortably share a problem with? When you have an issue that needs resolution and you’d like to talk it out, it’s helpful to bring it to a group of peers who can serve as a sounding board to hear the issue and give you some feedback.
In a way, Rotary is a network, there for members to use. There are certain rules limiting self-promotion, and the famous 4-way test, including “Is it fair to all concerned?” In a set of parameters, Rotary can be a safe place to talk about anything. For the network to operate properly, it must be founded on trust. And free of cliques. So all feel welcomed.
Each CEO needs a safe place to talk about issues that might be getting in the way of clear thinking.
Board members should encourage nonprofit CEOs to join Rotary. Or, join a network of peers with leadership experience who can be helpful resources when the going gets tough.
Do you have a place to talk about challenging situations in the workplace, outside of your workplace?

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What is Happening in Orlando to Heal from the Attack on Pulse

Celebrity tribute to 49 victims of Pulse attack https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nq6xRZlCSoM.
Posted by Human Rights Campaign.

How Heart of Florida United Way responds to Pulse tragedy.

2-1-1 and #OrlandoUnited

Two weeks+ following June 12, what is happening…who is contributing to the healing…in Orlando.

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Concentration of Wealth and Impact on Public Welfare

We seem in the USA to be on a track of more concentration of wealth in the hands of a very few. And then we hope that Warren Buffet and Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg et al will use their wealth for public good.
There are many foundations that direct wealth to nonprofits with a plan and with a reliable history.
There are individuals like Mr Zuckerberg who has a big idea and works with State of New Jersey to impose a new approach to education to the Newark schools.
Many of our fellow Americans think the super rich can work their magic on major national security problems or major social welfare challenges. Clearly, this is a serious misunderstanding.
We need to identify the right examples that actually bring improved conditions and apply tax and foundation assets to those. In a thoughtful and well-informed way.
The road we’re on at the moment is wasting valuable resources of the USA and not bringing us to resolution.

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The Mood of the Nation and Nonprofit Fundraising

Apparently we have Donald Trump as the Republican Party standard-bearer for President in the November election.
And it is likely that Hillary Clinton will be the Democratic Party choice…but there is still California and many Super Delegates to count. So the jury is out.
What impact does this unusual political season have on the charitable thinking and proclivities of the American people?
There is no one right answer for this. Nonprofit organizations, I believe, need to continue to make their case to their donor audience and keep delivering services that the mission promises and those served by you expect.
501(c)(3) nonprofits need to stay out of the political side of life. Yes, those who advocate for particular issues and want the government to do its job relative to delivery of service, to keep on speaking to those issues. So advocacy on mission-related issues is within the regs. It’s the political side that is not for a (c)(3).
Keep delivering the message. It’s a somewhat turbulent time politically. So keeping after the mission gives your donors encouragement that good work continues to get done.

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