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What’s Your Customer Saying?

Coming off recent posts with a marketing orientation, it’s time to focus on the nonprofit customer.

Who is the customer of your nonprofit organization?  It’s a good place to start to get clarity, so you, your board, your staff, your volunteers know who the customer is, know what the customer needs are, and how your group responds to those needs.

And to do this well, everyone needs to listen. The staff, the volunteers. Everyone.  EVERY. ONE.  So, from the executive director and the board chair all through the people charged with accomplishing the nonprofit mission: all are listening.  And what we all are hearing is important to capture. And respond.

the primary customers of the nonprofit are the people benefiting from the services provided. The theater subscribers. The kids enrolled in the Boys & Girls Club after-school program. The cancer patients being taken to their chemo and radiation therapy appointments.  It’s clear to all who the primary customer is, what this customer needs, and how we’re set up to meet those needs.

The supporting customers are those folks supporting the mission: stakeholders in the mission who donate, who volunteer who make it possible for the nonprofit to execute the mission: to deliver the essential service that’s provided.

How do we know we’re doing the best possible job we can?  We ask our customers. We design ways to gather information, the feedback that tells us if we’re on course or not. You can count on someone (at least one someone) to question the value of asking. It takes time. It takes use of some resources. Shouldn’t every available dollar go to our service? That’s a hard point to argue. But I urge you to counter the argument with: “How do we know we’re meeting the need we think we’re meeting if we don’t ask?  If we don’t listen to what our customer is saying?”

Just before writing this blog post, I read Micheal Stein’s “Internet Strategies for Nonprofit Sector.”  He’s good. He tweets as @mstein63. His latest post cited research by Convio, the fundraising database experts. He focused on step #4 of their ten steps to grow the constituent base (your donors): “segment your welcome messages.”  So in your communication with new donors, you tailor your message to the demographic and psychographic information you can collect so what you say has meaning to your donor: so it in a way reflects back what you hear them saying to you. This will help build a relationship. And donor loyalty.

It’s part of effective marketing strategy.  And if you’re thinking and behaving in this way, you’ll be many steps ahead of your competition.  Because all too many of your competitors are only thinking “outgoing.”  Not “incoming.”

You’ll be glad you did. Listen. To What Your Customer is Saying.

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